Potable alcohol in the world’s oldest surviving documents

World’s oldest surviving documents – The Vedas (meaning “knowledge”), were written as an attempt to document knowledge which up to this point was handed down by word of mouth from generation to generation.  The language is written in ancient Sanskrit (meaning refined speech), an Indo-Aryan language which later evolved into Hinduism, Jainism and Buddhism. Amongst […]

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Hairdressers distil in Scotland

A monopoly in distilling spirits in Edinburgh is granted to the newly established Guild of Surgeons and Barbers.  During early 16th century, barbers were more commonly associated with modern day GP’s, in addition to the more common practice of the “short back and sides”. The name barber derives from a Richard le Barber who was […]

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The printed word brings distillation to the masses

Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg, or simply Johannes Gutenberg, creates his ground breaking Gutenberg Press. This device incorporates a system of movable type faces, enabling mass-production of printed matter and opening the world to a new era of knowledge sharing.  This machine directly influences the spread of the emerging industry of commercial distillation. An […]

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The origins of “Elixir”

Abū-Yūsuf Ya‘qūb ibn Isḥāq ibn as-Ṣabbāḥ ibn ‘Omrān ibn Isma‘īl al-Kindī – thankfully more simply known as Al-Kindi or Alkindus in Latin – is regarded as the first person to create a potable liquid through the distilling of a wine and thereby created an early brandy. Alkindus labeled this unique liquid as an al’iksir meaning […]

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Invention of the pot still

Abu Musa Jābir ibn Hayyān – known simply as Gerber or Al-Jabir by the scholarly Latin communities – is acknowledged as being the first documented to design and implement the common “pot still” circa 790 AD.  Today the pot still remains an essential tool for producing premium spirits and other chemical compounds. While there is little […]

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